We have to prepare for our death #alreadydead

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The belief in new technology allows us to avoid the insight that this civilisation has no future.

Last year, Therese Uddenfeldt visited an exhibition at Bonniers Art Hall; I’m not an art critic so I’m going to leave my views on the exhibition there, but in passing, I can mention that it was awful.

The work originated from the opera “Aniara”, that is, the music of Harry Martinson space epics. You know, the earth has been wrecked by environmental degradation, and humanity’s last hope is to set the course toward Mars.

The artist Susan Philipsz had picked out the leading part tune and let a violinist record the ballot, tone by tone. Accordingly first C. Then C#, then D and so on. Afterwards, the tones had been placed in the correct order but in different channels, after which in the art gallery were played in twelve different speakers hanging here and there. Twice I went there; both times it was grassy.

Then I realised the genius. Philipsz had in a screwed way illustrated how we approached the “environmental issue”. Just like “Aniara” had shrunk from a powerful harmony to scattered tones, we have long ago ceased to see the biosphere as a living whole. And, in many ways, it is a rational strategy, because it allows us to believe that now, now we are overtaking it. The death of our civilisation.

Does it seem far-fetched?

Let me share a text with youSome time ago, I came across a chapter by the sociologist Zygmunt Bauman. One of his basic ideas is that modernity, what we live and breathe – so to speak, since the Enlightenment is characterised by the belief that everything is going to be fixed. For man there is no obstacle too big to overcome.

But there is a small problem. Death. And not just a small problem, but the ultimate mockery. In fact, death can not be defeated and therefore it threatens our entire world image. Death must be handled in some way.

One way, according to Bauman, has been to stop talking about death instead of talking about health. So much more reassuring, right? Another approach has been to divide the death of a lot of isolated areas dealing with their own speciality. In these boxes we plow down the capital and cutting-edge research and every medical progress, preferably as expensive and technically advanced as possible, dampens our concerns. Soon, we will even abolish death!

During the reading of Bauman, I thought about how we just have dealt with “the environment”.  At the furious and accelerating pace, the core of Western life is transforming high-quality natural resources into debris (products on the shelves). It is a process that on the road generates extinction of species, overfishing, deforestation, plastic islands in the Pacific, toxic chemicals and so on. In short, there is a constant degradation of the biological system. Thus, if we continue as now, our civilisation is sentenced.

But instead of realising it, we choose to discuss sustainability. That sounds nicer? In the same way as death, no sorry health, has been divided into separate, highly specialised expert areas, “Sustainability” has been sliced into manageable pieces of the cake with their own brand new technological achievements. Solar cells glued to skyscrapers! Car batteries being charged when we burn on the highway! Artificial photosynthesis! Sure it feels like everything is going right? Because we will come up with new solutions. That is how the modern man works. But as much as a vaccine against Alzheimer’s makes us immortal, cheap solar cells will make a growth society sustainable.

Just as a vaccine against Alzheimer’s makes us immortal, cheap solar cells will make a growth society sustainable.

Although I suspect that it is contrary to the theory of paradigm shifts (It is not so that only afterwards can put into words what happened?), I think we find ourselves in such a moment, and that the break point is the view of solar cells (PV). For those who belong to modernity, green technology is the solution. To me, and some other foil hats, they only make the situation worse.

It is not the first time in history that humanity has lived in parallel realities, side by side, with such a diametrical view of something so trivial. A fine example is in Yuval Noah Hararis “Sapiens”, in a passage about Christoper Columbus. As a Christian, Columbus collected his worldview from the Bible and there are only three continents mentioned: Europe, Africa and Asia. A fourth continent was therefore unthinkable.

But while the bubbling of ideas in 14th century Italy. Out of curiosity, and a pure desire to understand the world as a whole. The Renaissance challenged the biblical world order and laid the foundations for a scientific, empirical approach. Suddenly there was room for a new continent: America.

One might say that America was both there and did not exist during this period: some acknowledged the continent and others did not. The Renaissance and the Middle Ages lived side by side. As for Columbus, he held fast to that he had cast anchor on the coast of Asia. He was into the last a medieval man, Harari states.

The new America of our time, I would like to say, is the solar cells (PV). Those who believe in “Green Tech” are still in a paradigm where the idea is, we always find a solution. This is predominant or prevalent. Which could thus make large parts of the environmental movement into: Columbus.

So who is the new Renaissance manor woman of our time, today’s Leonardo, if anyone? I have a suggestion.

Writer Roy Scranton. Our crisis can not be tackled by electric cars or agreements at all, he claims. “Our greatest challenge is of philosophical nature: to understand that this civilisation is already dead.”

Scranton’s personal background plays a certain role. He is also the war veteran. After surviving 14 months at the Iraqi front, he came home to the United States and hoped for a comfortable middle class life as a poetry teacher. But when the World Bank and the IPCC gave its gloomy future scenarios, it struck him that these institutions are not a flutter from the left but, on the contrary, deeply invested in global capitalism, so … it kind of blew my mind. I had this moment: this is for real. Scranton needed to process his insight in any way and resulted in an essay: “Learning to die in the Anthropocene”. 

Scranton is accustomed to giving his experience of Iraq a particular mystery; You do not have to be a soldier to experience constant terror. But he admits that, as a veteran, he had an advantage when he began to twist and turn the “Anthropocene” because he had done something strange to many environmentalists: confronted his own death.

Learning to die is hard, he writes. It requires daily exercise. And every morning, after taking care of his Humvee, Scranton trained. He saw in front of him how he was blown, shot, raised, crossed, torn by dogs, captured and throat. Then, before rolling over the barbed wire, he thought he did not have to worry about it anymore because he was already dead.

As said, he does not want to give war experiences a special aura. But he believes that, thanks to the daily interaction with the idea of ​​his own wreck, he could more easily see what our supremacy about new technology really is about. Namely fear of death. The belief in new technology allows us to avoid the realisation that this civilisation is already dead.

Many fade from such a pessimism and question how it can help us. I myself feel that someone has released fresh air in an unhealthy environmental debate that revolves around the fact that the price of solar cells only drops a bit so … 

Yes what? Well, then we can continue to convert high-grade natural resources to junk. Cheap Renewable Technology – Thumbs Up. The downside – more exploitation, deforestation, plastic islands in the Pacific, toxic chemicals, extinction of species – are topics for other conferences, other studies, other protocols. Because the modern approach can not handle the holistic manner, but only narrow slices of the cake.

The First Violin, the the leading part tune finely-divided into twelve different speakers instead of an entire orchestra.

We compartmentalise, with a long word. Chops and pour the biosphere in the various vessels that do not communicate with each other. This is why we can sign the #ParisAgreement, and at the same time believe that it is possible to maintain a high standard of living.

Has it been caught better than by the poet Jonas Gren?

“The car sales record and the 2-degree goal, aimed at 1.5

Royal Dutch Shell and the 2-degree goal, aimed at 1.5

Statoil and the 2-degree goal, aiming at 1.5

TTIP and 2-degree goal, aiming at 1.5

Tokyo Stock Exchange the 2-degree goal, aiming at 1.5″

Paris calling. Did you know that we Swedes must reduce our emissions to one tenth per person per year to live up to the 1.5-degree goal? In my instinct, I thought that I would be bombarded by a newly established authority on how to make a lighter burden for the earth. That the Bulletin Board would resurface to spread good advice to the entire Swedish people. But I have not heard a sound, because there are no brochures. There is no new authority. There are no political suggestions about how to reduce my consumption.

The hope is that our shopping pleasure will increase, while new technology will miraculously tear away the traces of the biological system.

It’s because nobody wants us to do it. On the contrary, hope is that our shopping pleasure will increase, while new technology will miraculously tear away the traces of the biological system.

Because it leaves its mark. The resources to be converted into products on the shelf are taken from – the natural environment. The waste that this activity generates is dumped in – the natural environment. Economic growth at our level breaks down the ecological system. There is no way around it.

The absence of this thermodynamic reality in the debate makes me from confused to desperate, hit straight in the heart :. But I’m not alone.

Yes, I may be a little crazy. In here, in my bubble, in our shared solutions bubble there are also a lot of disjointed tones from a lonely violin solo, and they drive me to insanity.

Imagine – if we had to listen to the opera in its entirety. What would be possible then?

 

 

Source: elbilsnytt.se

All local governments need to draft Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan (#UCEEP)

All local governments need to draft Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan (#UCEEP) (.pdf-document for download here)

Dealing with a climate crisis has now gone #planetary — planners and policy makers alert the importance for vulnerable citizens of having an Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan policy in place for the outcome of the New Urban Agenda, proven realistic in an actual emergency. Environment havocs in the footsteps of climate change require for the first time to mainstream conservation disaster relief planning.

#ConservationAction #LandStewardship #TalanoaDialogue #GCAS2018 #COP24 #FutureofPlaces #Greenbelt #DRR
#Placemaking #COP21 #COP22 #COP23 #UrbanAction #Habitat3 #NewUrbanAgenda #PublicSpace
#WUC #TheFutureWeWant #TheCityWeNeed #UrbanSDG #UrbanAction #UrbanThinkers #NetZero
#Youngplacemakers #Roadmap2030 #ClimateAction #Vulnerability #Planetary #SDG11 #Listen2Cities
#NoCountryAlone #NewUrbanGovernance #NAZCAportal #UNEA2 #Cities4Climate #G7EMM
#Listen2Cities #SB48Bonn #SB44 #APA1 #Bonn #Pre2020Action #C40Award #AOSIS #GUANXI

Restoring Hope: Rethink & Re-imagine Our #Cities – Adopt #SDGDRR – #SDG18

World Urban Forum Bulletin: RESTORING HOPE: BUILDING BACK CITIES AND COMMUNITIES TOGETHER AFTER DISASTER:

David Evans, UN-Habitat, opened the session. Explaining that, ‘our actions should build on the resilience of people,’ he warned that excluding those affected by disasters during rebuilding will cause unintended harm. In his keynote address, Robert Glasser, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, noted that lack of knowledge and financial capacity leads to disaster vulnerability – gaps that can be filled through implementing the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction. Moderator Sri Husnaini Sofjan, Huairou Commission, invited panellists from Haiti, Iran, Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal and the Philippines to share their experiences of how they responded to disasters in their country. Panellists highlighted the importance of conducting training schemes for masons and engineers, and enabling affected populations to actively participate in rebuilding their communities following a disaster. Many underscored the importance of disaster preparedness.
 
Hans Guttman, Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre, moderated a second panel in the session. Panellists from the European Commission, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the UN Development Programme, and the World Bank called for increased engagement with those affected by disasters and recognition of their agency, emphasising the need for accountability, coordination and across all sectors and levels. Several added that time-sensitive preparedness plans are crucial, and the European Commission questioned how to ‘build back’ not just from natural disasters but from man-made disasters caused by civil war.
 
Audience members called for the inclusion of grassroots leaders, and particularly women, in disaster recovery, emphasising their roles as agents of change #SDGDRR#SDG18

The conclusion of the 9th World Urban Forum, #KualaLumpurDeclaration towards 2036 #SDGDRR – #SDG18

 

This is an emergency action opportunity to promote #SDG18 DISASTER RISK RESILIENCE for global disaster security with reference to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Response (#DRR). #SDGDRR #Resilience

 

Local government leaders must prioritise climate change action (#CCA) to mitigate and prepare for urban disaster risk reduction (#DRR). #ParisAgreement (#PA). Just half of the elected representatives or city officials arrive in office with a deep understanding of disaster risk-impact and climate change.

 

Non-avoidable risk-impact assessment in urban planning and design
Local implementation calls for the recognition and strengthening of local actors as agents for sustainable urban development and the promotion of decentralised government systems.

 

Every council’s planning committees casting plans way ahead of the next World Habitat Conference 2036.

 

Change proposed

 

By adopting SDG18 DISASTER RISK RESILIENCE will provide insightful examples for cities not only on the planning and implementing of the risk-sensitive plans but also on engaging multi-sectoral dialogue in resilience building processes; Risk-Informed Subnational Development Planning at all levels to put in place strong governance foundations so that risk-informed development can be sustained in near future planning and budgeting processes, tools, plans and policies, which in turn contributes directly to the implementation of Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (#Switch2Sendai), the New Urban Agenda (#NUA) and the Sustainable Development Goals (#SDGs).

 

The SDG18 would deliver risk-informed development through a comprehensive range of services, e.g. strengthen financial and institutional capacity within the Global Goals.

 

Outcome document-UN_Habitat_Urban Climatic Disaster Response – Adopt SDG18 – https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/ClimateChangeCentreReading-UN_Habitat_Urban-Climatic-Disaster-Response-Adopt-SDG18.pdf

 

Thank you for taking your time and interest in also local urban resilient development. “Bigger picture thinkers make better humans”

 

#forumbandarsedunia9

 

#Cities2030 #Citiesforall #NUA2030 #SDGs #WomensAssemblyWUF9 #COP24 #AAAA #wuf9kl2018 #wuf9 #wuf9kl #MarrakeshPartnership #UCEEP #Bonn #Fiji #Talanoa4Ambition #CitiesIPCC #Local4action #Mayors4Climate #Urbanlaw #Urbanyouth #Listen2Cities

Non-avoidable risk-impact assessment in urban planning and design – #wuf9

For once, please put your professional career on hold for just six days and take it to the 9th World Urban Forum (WUF9).

 

In just 17 years nothing is going to look the same again. The unprecedented threats from our changing climate being discussed are: Multi- droughts, floods, heat-waves, superstorms, forest fires, land degradation or tree diseases (beetles or fungi) and acid rains will have hit everyone everywhere. Mass-migration, warfare, airborne viruses, pathogen diseases and epidemies just to mention a few of the forth coming horrors… To slow down these non-avoidable man-made (non-climate related) hazard scenarios emergency and evacuation, we need to plan urban resilience right now.

Local government leaders must prioritise climate change action (CCA) to mitigate and prepare for urban disaster risk reduction (DRR).

 

The World Urban Forum is the one existing multi-scalar context to plan and prepare for global development in our changing climate, please take learning from its extensive and comprehensive programme and discussions between 7th to 13th February – http://wuf9.org. It offers a unique opportunity to share good practices from the cities resilience profiling programmes on the development and mainstreaming of DRR plans and multi-stakeholder’s engagement in the operationalization of resilience building strategies.

 

WUF9 will provide insightful examples for cities not only on the planning and implementing of the risk-sensitive plans but also on engaging multi-sectoral dialogue in resilience building processes.

 

This is a final call upon local governments leaders to develop integrated local Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Resilience plans to guide their actions. Professionals, promote local-level-authorities power and capacity for resilience in developing and implementing DRR policies and actions in local legislation. It takes time to invest and deliver urban shock tolerance.

 

This call is as in effect an early warning system as a way of raising awareness and mobilising public interest more than that public demand for changes to reduce disaster risk.

 

Six days of your life, you can do this.

 


 

If worst come to worst, we must NOW plan for underground living. Urban Underground Space with the aim to increase mobility, liveability and resilience of urban area. Places urban underground space within the context of climate change, city resilience and rapid urbanisation.

 

“Bigger picture thinkers make better humans”, “SDGs will not be achieved unless we address climate risks and disaster risks”~Amina Mohamed UN Dpty Sec Gen

 

#Cities2030 #Citiesforall #NUA2030 #SDGs #WomensAssemblyWUF9 #COP24 #AAAA
#wuf9 #wuf9kl #forumbandarsedunia9 #MarrakeshPartnership #UCEEP #Bonn #Fiji #Talanoa #Talanoa4Ambition

Secure a safer city in Reading’s New Local Plan

Reading Borough Council will not be able to accept representations made after Friday 26th January 2018.

Please see Climate Change Centre Reading’s representation below,

https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/ClimateChangeCentreReading-RBC-Planning-Policy-Team_A-representation-about-the-New-Local-Plan.pdf

#NewLocalPlan – #climatechange #ParisAgreement #SDGs

The purpose with this Representation/Objection is via policy innovation and risk/protection impact evaluation, to improve Reading’s local urban development practices and planning, to support the British realm and ambitions to become a great global leader in the fight against global warming. #UK

Climate Chance World Summit – Agadir declaration of climate actors

WooW Ecopreneurs,

I took part in 2nd Climate Chance World Summit 4 days of recommendations for non-state actors, time for action. Really a Climate Chance action opportunity (operative), with United Nations normative Climate Action Agenda it’s a match made in Heaven. The success of Climate Chance 2017 offer a mandate to go ahead and fulfil an important role, the urgency of implementation of the SDGs together with the New Urban Agenda.

Debated was a proposed platform for Multi-actors governance and Multi-stakeholders to carry out this future operative role. An independent UN Partner for Decentralized Urban Cooperation to Assess and Enhance Strategic Effectiveness of UN perhaps?

With the new much needed global grassroots platform for Climate Innovation Labs Ecopreneurs for the Climate has an impacting role to play. An instrument for facilitative dialouge in bridging the gap between non-state climate organisers and implementers engaged in the fight against climate change 🙂 #COP23 #WUF9 #Cities4All #Cities2030

Climate Change Centre Reading / Ecopreneurs for the Climate in Reading

(Ecopreneurs for the Climate, a glocal community of climate practice, a global network of climate innovation labs #ECO4CLIM17) Priorities should be aimed at resilience and urban disaster response with reinsurance ~ “Leaving no one behind”

Background

The Climate Chance World Summit 2017 has just ended in Agadir, Morocco. With 5,000 participants from 80 nationalities, this summit represents a real success and reinforces the Climate Chance approach as a framework for enhanced cooperation between non-State actors.

#ccagadir2017: Launch of local and regional elected representatives of Africa to mobilize African civil society.

Please find here the text of the Agadir Declaration by climate actors, adopted at the closing plenary of the Summit this Wednesday 13 September.

The #Agadir declaration of the non-state Climate Actors “Intensify together action and ambition” #OnePlanet #Katowice #COP24

This declaration was prepared with the focal points of the major groups recognized by the UN (environmental NGOs, trade unions, businesses, local governments, indigenous peoples, youth, women and so forth.). It has already been signed by a significant number of the leading world networks of climate actors (CGLU, ICLEI, NRG4SD, R20, C40, YOUNGO, AIMF, CAN, WECF, CSI/ITUC, IPACC…)

Entitled “Stepping up climate action and goals together” w/ the #MarrakeshPartnership #PlanetClimate #OnePlanetSummit, this declaration, which follows on from the two previous declarations from the “Climate and territories – Lyon, 2015” and “Climate Chance – Nantes, 2016” Summits, is not meant to be yet another declaration of intent, but rather a specific roadmap to backup and roll out concrete action more widely in local territories and consolidate the frameworks for dialogue between non-State and national government climate actors, particularly in connection with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Climate Chance place particular emphasis on the importance of the facilitative dialogue planned for 2018 and the need to reassess States’ ambition as set out in their voluntary contributions (NDCs), which could draw on the mobilization and capacity for action of their climate actors who are still frequently ignored or undervalued.

We agree with its points – content and are proud to be a signatory for the “Déclaration d’Agadir / Climate Chance World Summit of climate actors” to be presented at COP23 etc.

– The necessity for a common approach regarding climate and development;
– The necessity for an easier access to finance, particularly for actors in developing States;

– Key point for this non-State actors’ roadmap: to get ready to contribute to the evaluation of the 2018 voluntary contributions (NDCs), each State will present to the Paris Agreement framework.

As an vital driver for urban resilience progress;
– Being an operational stakeholder and partner with non-governmental actors, civil society and private sectors at all levels for urgent implementation.

We fully support The declaration of Local and Subnational Leaders of Africa « Fighting against climate change in Africa together »

Wouldn’t we prefer to see purpose-driven agenda, with one purpose to sustain, all urban human activities..

The declaration focuses especially on the challenges of adaptation, access to funding and the importance of the thematic coalitions and sectoral plans of action. It stresses the willingness of non-State climate actors to work more closely with the scientific community pending the next IPCC reports and pays homage to the mobilization of American elected representatives, businesses, researchers and NGOs through the “We are still in” initiative.

Eco4ClimRD Climate Innovation +Jobs Strategy 2.5

This is not happening!

To save lives and reduce impact, we have no choice but to reject Reading Borough Council’s New Local Plan setting out how Reading will develop the next 18 years… What is the design-life of the new housing stock? Has any risk evaluation been conducted? The plan is not adequate and thorough enough to meet immediate and near future requirements for city development planning. Use the form below to STOP the madness.

http://www.reading.gov.uk/media/8063/Guidance-on-making-representations/doc/Guidance_on_making_representations.docx

Please refer to the;
Eco4ClimRD Climate Innovation +Jobs Strategy 2.5 published on the 12.12 at 12.12 pm

https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Eco4ClimRD-Climate-Innovation-Jobs-Strategy-Outcome-Document-12-December-2017.pdf

 

Ecopreneurs for the Climate in Reading
1st December 2017 –
“Better City – Better Life “~Shanghai Expo 2010

UN HABITAT vs. URBAN DISASTER LAW and CONFLICT HAZARD #NUA

Africa – Americas – Arab States – Asia & Pacific – Central Asia – Europe

UN Habitat will Adopt, commit, implement, encourage, promote adequate investments, support, recognize, invite, underscore and promote urban disaster response;

Urban climatic disaster response – #Disasterlaw

From All cities implementing policies endorsing Urban Climatic Emergency Evacuation Plan (#UCEEP) initiative to What is the military’s role in the New Urban Agenda?

Disaster law initiatives to combat climate change
“Duty-to-protect”

Drawing the state of disaster action around the world
“Duty-to-warn”

Participatory meetings to get to concrete catastrophe risk insurance solutions
“Duty-to-prevent”

Increase ability to have national drr assessment strategies, risk assessments International cooperating and access to early warning systems and drr information and assessment that need to be deliver to all by 2030.
“Duty-to-inform”

(urban/rural) disaster law, an urgent step-up of multi-stakeholder collaboration, coalitions of non-state actors and their flagship disaster adaptation initiatives?
“Duty-to-respond”

Unsupported substantial self-settlements without assistance shelter permanent shanti towns
“Duty-to-shelter”

Their objectives are to stay mobilized, accelerate climate action and streamline the implementation of the Paris Agreement, the Agenda for Action.

“Strengthening concrete action to bridge the gap between current commitments and the objective of emergency in the Paris Agreement”.

 

RE: Resolution 71/235, 71/256, Draft-Outcome-Document-of-Habitat-III-E

We take full account of the milestone achievements of the year 2015, in particular the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Sustainable Development Goals, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the third International Conference on Financing for Development, the Paris
Agreement adopted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction for the period 2015–2030, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014–2024, the Small Island Developing States Accelerated Modalities of Action Pathway and the Istanbul Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011–2020. We also take account of the Rio Declaration on
Environment and Development, the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the World Summit for Social Development, the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development and the follow-up to these conferences.

Adopt and implement disaster risk reduction and management, reduce vulnerability, build resilience and responsiveness to natural and human-made hazards, and foster mitigation of and adaptation to climate change;

We aim to achieve cities and human settlements where all persons are able to enjoy equal rights and opportunities, as well as their fundamental freedoms, guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, including full respect for international law. In this regard, the New Urban Agenda is grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights treaties, the Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit Outcome. It is informed by other instruments such as the Declaration on the Right to Development.

Ensure environmental sustainability, by promoting clean energy and sustainable use of land and resources in urban development; by protecting ecosystems and biodiversity, including adopting healthy lifestyles in harmony with nature; by promoting sustainable consumption and production patterns; by building urban resilience; by reducing disaster risks; and by mitigating and adapting to climate change.

We acknowledge that in implementing the New Urban Agenda particular attention should be given to addressing the unique and emerging urban development challenges facing all countries, in particular developing countries, including African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States, as well as the specific challenges facing middle-income countries. Special attention should also be given to countries in situations of conflict,
as well as countries and territories under foreign occupation, post-conflict countries, and countries affected by natural and human-made disasters.

We commit ourselves to strengthening the coordination role of national, subnational and local governments, as appropriate, and their collaboration with other public entities and non-governmental organizations in the provision of social and basic services for all, including generating investments in communities that are most vulnerable to disasters and those affected by recurrent and protracted humanitarian crises. We further commit ourselves to promoting adequate services, accommodation and opportunities for decent and productive work for crisis-affected persons in urban settings, and to working with local communities and local governments to identify opportunities for engaging and developing local, durable and dignified solutions while ensuring that aid also flows to affected persons and host communities to prevent regression of their development.

We acknowledge the need for governments and civil society to further support resilient urban services during armed conflicts. We also acknowledge the need to reaffirm full respect for international humanitarian law.

We recognize that cities and human settlements face unprecedented threats from unsustainable consumption and production patterns, loss of biodiversity, pressure on ecosystems, pollution, natural and human-made disasters, and climate change and its related risks, undermining the efforts to end poverty in all its forms and dimensions and to achieve sustainable development. Given cities’ demographic trends and their central role in the global economy, in the mitigation and adaptation efforts related to climate change, and in the use of resources and ecosystems, the way they are planned, financed, developed, built, governed and managed has a direct impact on sustainability and resilience well beyond urban boundaries.

We also recognize that urban centres worldwide, especially in developing countries, often have characteristics that make them and their inhabitants especially vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change and other natural and human-made hazards, including earthquakes, extreme weather events, flooding, subsidence, storms – including dust and sand storms – heat waves, water scarcity, droughts, water and air pollution, vector-borne diseases, and sea-level rise particularly affecting coastal areas, delta regions and small island developing States, among others.

We commit ourselves to facilitating the sustainable management of natural resources in cities and human settlements in a manner that protects and improves the urban ecosystem and environmental
services, reduces greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and promotes disaster risk reduction and management, by supporting the development of disaster risk reduction strategies and periodical
assessments of disaster risk caused by natural and human-made hazards, including standards for risk levels, while fostering sustainable economic development and protecting all persons’ well-being and quality of life through environmentally sound urban and territorial planning, infrastructure and basic services.

We commit ourselves to promoting the creation and maintenance of well-connected and well-distributed networks of open, multi-purpose, safe, inclusive, accessible, green, and quality public spaces; to improving the resilience of cities to disasters and climate change, including floods, drought risks and heat waves; to improving food security and nutrition, physical and mental health, and household and ambient air quality; to reducing noise and promoting attractive and liveable cities, human settlements and urban landscapes, and to prioritizing the conservation of endemic species.

We commit ourselves to strengthening the sustainable management of resources, including land, water (oceans, seas and freshwater), energy, materials, forests and food, with particular attention to the environmentally sound management and minimization of all waste, hazardous chemicals, including air and short-lived climate pollutants, greenhouse gases and noise, and in a way that considers urban–rural linkages, functional supply and value chains vis à vis environmental impact and sustainability, and that strives to transition to a circular economy while facilitating ecosystem conservation, regeneration, restoration and resilience in the face of new and emerging challenges.

We commit ourselves to strengthening the resilience of cities and human settlements, including through the development of quality infrastructure and spatial planning, by adopting and implementing integrated, age- and gender-responsive policies and plans and ecosystem-based approaches in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction for the period 2015–2030; and by mainstreaming holistic and data-informed disaster risk reduction and management at all levels to reduce vulnerabilities and risk, especially in risk-prone areas of formal and informal settlements, including slums, and to enable households, communities, institutions and services to prepare for, respond to, adapt to and rapidly recover from the effects of hazards, including shocks or latent stresses. We will promote the development of infrastructure that is resilient and resource efficient and will reduce the risks and impact of disasters, including the rehabilitation and upgrading of slums and informal settlements. We will also promote measures for strengthening and retrofitting all risky housing stock, including in slums and informal settlements, to make it resilient to disasters in coordination with local authorities and stakeholders.

We commit ourselves to supporting moving from reactive to more proactive risk-based, all-hazards and all-of-society approaches, such as raising public awareness of risks and promoting ex-ante investments to prevent risks and build resilience, while also ensuring timely and effective local responses to address the immediate needs of inhabitants affected by natural and human-made disasters and conflicts. This should include the integration of the “build back better” principles into the post disaster recovery process to integrate resilience-building, environmental and spatial.

We strongly urge States to refrain from promulgating and applying any unilateral economic, financial or trade measures not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations that impede the full achievement of economic and social development, particularly in
developing countries.

We will integrate disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation and mitigation considerations and measures into age- and gender-responsive urban and territorial development and planning processes, including greenhouse gas emissions, resilience-based and climate-effective design of spaces, buildings and constructions, services and infrastructure, and nature-based solutions. We will promote cooperation and coordination across sectors, as well as build the capacities of local authorities to develop and implement disaster risk reduction and response plans, such as risk assessments concerning the location of current and future public facilities, and to formulate adequate contingency and evacuation procedures.

We will consider increased allocations of financial and human resources, as appropriate, for the upgrading and, to the extent possible, prevention of slums and informal settlements in the allocation of financial and human resources with strategies that go beyond physical and environmental improvements to ensure that slums and informal settlements are integrated into the social, economic, cultural and political dimensions of cities. These strategies should include, as applicable, access to sustainable, adequate, safe and affordable housing, basic and social services, and safe, inclusive, accessible, green and quality public spaces, and they should promote security of tenure and its regularization, as well as measures for conflict prevention and mediation.

We will promote the development of adequate and enforceable regulations in the housing sector, including, as applicable, resilient building codes, standards, development permits, land use by-laws and ordinances, and planning regulations; combating and preventing speculation, displacement, homelessness and arbitrary forced evictions; and ensuring sustainability, quality, affordability, health, safety, accessibility, energy and resource efficiency, and resilience. We will also promote differentiated analysis of housing supply and demand based on high-quality, timely and reliable disaggregated data at the national, subnational and local levels, considering specific social, economic, environmental and cultural dimensions.

We will promote adequate investments in protective, accessible and sustainable infrastructure and service provision systems for water, sanitation and hygiene, sewage, solid waste management, urban drainage, reduction of air pollution and stormwater management, in order to improve safety in the event of water-related disasters; improve health; ensure universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all, as well as access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all; and end open defecation, with special attention to the needs and safety of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations. We will seek to ensure that this infrastructure is climate resilient and forms part of integrated urban and territorial development plans, including housing and mobility, among others, and is implemented in a participatory manner, considering, innovative, resource-efficient, accessible, context-specific and culturally sensitive sustainable solutions.

We will support decentralized decision-making on waste disposal to promote universal access to sustainable waste management systems. We will support the promotion of extended producer responsibility schemes that include waste generators and producers in the financing of urban waste management systems, that reduce the hazards and socio economic impacts of waste streams and increase recycling rates through better product design.

We will promote the integration of food security and the nutritional needs of urban residents, particularly the urban poor, in urban and territorial planning, in order to end hunger and malnutrition. We will promote coordination of sustainable food security and agriculture policies across urban, peri-urban and rural areas to facilitate the production, storage, transport and marketing of food to consumers in adequate and affordable ways in order to reduce food losses and prevent and reuse food waste. We will further promote the coordination of food policies with energy, water, health, transport and waste policies, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds and reduce the use of hazardous chemicals, and implement other policies in urban areas to maximize efficiencies and minimize waste.

We will explore and develop feasible solutions for climate and disaster risks in cities and human settlements, including through collaborating with insurance and reinsurance institutions and other relevant actors, with regard to investments in urban and metropolitan infrastructure, buildings and other urban assets, as well as for local populations to secure their shelter and economic needs.

We reaffirm the role and expertise of UN-Habitat, within its mandate, as a focal point for sustainable urbanization and human settlements, in collaboration with other United Nations system entities, recognizing the linkages between sustainable urbanization and, inter alia, sustainable
development, disaster risk reduction and climate change.

 

Source: HABITAT III NEW URBAN AGENDA Draft outcome document for adoption in Quito, October 2016

High Level Meeting on #NewUrbanAgenda and UN-Habitat

GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Setting the scene – High Level Meeting on New Urban Agenda and UN-Habitat – September 5 – September 6

To realise the potential, however, the challenges cannot be ignored. Urban populations continue to grow in much of the world, poverty and humanitarian crises and conflict are becoming increasingly urban phenomena, and the urban risks from climate change are intensifying. Concerted efforts, global, national and local, in both developed and developing countries, are urgently needed to address current challenges, alleviate increasing inequalities, and anticipate future threats. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Opportunities (encompassing the Sustainable
Development Goals, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Addis Ababa Conference on Financing for Development) will not be met without serious attention to urban realities. The New Urban Agenda provides a roadmap for this
on-going transition, and UN-Habitat, with the entire UN development system, has a potentially critical role in supporting countries to effectively implement this Agenda.

The urban transition is essential to economic growth. Yet this basic reality is still unrecognised by many major actors, from national governments to international institutions, resulting in policies that limit migration in an attempt to slow urbanisation and restrict the access of local urban governments to development financing. Despite the restrictions, urban migration continues, and in the absence of inclusive and supportive policies and investment, this means limited opportunity for hard pressed new residents, growing backlogs in provision of services, increasing informality and the disappearance for many residents of the vaunted “urban advantage”. In many countries, for example, while rural child mortality rates are improving, in urban areas they are stagnating or
becoming worse. Poverty, hunger, disease, vulnerability to disaster, violence, are all becoming increasingly prevalent in many urban areas.
The urban transition will be more or less complete in fifty years. If it is not steered constructively now, the urban dividend could in many more
places become a disaster marked by inequality exclusion, inadequate basic service provision, humanitarian crises and growing civil strife.

The challenges in poor urban settlements are intensified in many areas by the mounting hazards associated with extreme weather. Cities, with their concentrations of population and assets, face high levels of risk, especially in coastal or riverside locations. Urban economies of scale and proximity can give cities a strong adaptive capacity, but the benefits seldom extend to all parts of a city. Informal settlements are often in the most hazardous locations – floodplains, hillsides at risk of landslides, sites close to industrial wastes – and unserved by the protective infrastructure that allows people to withstand extreme conditions – roads, drains, early warning systems and emergency services. Residents in poverty also have more limited capacity to prepare for, withstand and recover from a range of weather extremes. These same extremes, along with conflict, are pushing more people into towns and cities. By 2016, 80 million people globally were displaced by conflicts and disasters. Numbers keep climbing, and more than half end up now in towns and cities, adding to the burdens faced by overtaxed local authorities. Full blown conflict, often over access to land and scarce urban resources, has also become an increasingly common feature of urban areas, contributing to the emergence of the new category of the “fragile city.”

 

The call for action: The 2030 agenda and the New Urban Agenda

Recognising the critical need for action on pressing urban issues, government representatives at the Habitat III conference in Quito in 2016 adopted the New Urban Agenda (NUA), emphasising the links between urbanisation and development and the crucial need for inclusive and sustainable urban growth. The ambitious 2030 Agenda, adopted a year before the NUA, provides a critical overarching roadmap for this effort. Its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), designed for stimulating action in areas critical for humanity and the planet, include Goal 11 – making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Without attention to this urban Goal, and to the urban implications of the other 16 Goals, none of the SDGs is likely to succeed. Together the NUA and SDGs point the way for cities to be part of sustainable global
development. Equally important in this endeavour are the Paris Climate Change Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.

 

The scope of the commitment

Yet urban areas, with their growing majority of the global population, their concentration of both economic risk and potential, their vulnerability to climate-related disasters, and their relationships with surrounding areas, are not only relevant to realising this Agenda, they are central to its success, and the stage on which the SDGs will or will not be achieved. Most of the Goals necessarily have urban implications, and without significant attention to urban realities in all their manifestations and complexity, the ambitious objectives of the SDGs cannot be realised.

 

Public-private partnerships – ITU

ICTs for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation for SIDS

THE HABITAT III INNOVATION and SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLE