If there was a #SDG18 it might well coalesce around the concept of #ResilienceforAll

 

As it is, the concept of resilience is fundamental to achieving all of the SDGs, seeking as they do to strengthen people’s ability to survive, cope and thrive on this planet.

 

Over the last couple of months, I have met and heard from politicians and civil society representatives from over 100 countries meeting in regional platforms for disaster risk reduction in the Americas, Europe and Asia.

 

All take the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 as their manifesto, providing guidance and a gateway towards coping with a world where inclusion is under threat, disaster displacement is an everyday occurrence, urbanization is proceeding at breakneck speed and the earth’s resources are being used up at an alarming rate.

 

Building ‘resilience for all’ seems to be the underlying theme, be it for the most vulnerable people, the displaced, or for those affected by rapid urbanization which ignores the principles of good land use and safe building codes.

 

We have had wide-ranging discussions on subjects as diverse as resilient infrastructure, the role of eco-systems, the protection of livestock, accessibility to multi-hazard early warning systems, public-private cooperation and working with informal settlements.

 

A key issue that surfaces time and again is concern over disaster displacement. This is now a chronic issue which needs to be addressed if we are to make progress on making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable as SDG 11 calls for.

 

Just in the last week, my own country Japan has had to cope with the most extensive disaster event since the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011. The floods and landslides have caused over 200 deaths or missing, great disruption to normal life and highlighted once more how even the best disaster-prepared countries in the world can be blind-sided by extreme weather events fueled by climate change.

 

My heart it torn to see the tragic images that are emerging from Japan, and my thoughts are with those who have lost their loved ones and are now living under extremely difficult conditions.

 

Millions of people in Japan were ordered to vacate their homes earlier this month and forced displacement because of disaster events, usually a flood or a storm, is now a chronic problem in many parts of the world.

 

Consistently over the last ten years, more people have been displaced by natural hazards than by conflict. According to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, last year conflict and disasters displaced 30.6 million people within their own countries and this included 18.8 million people displaced by disasters in 135 countries.

 

We note a number of things about how efforts to build societies resilient to disasters are falling short.

 

First, it is the poor who are disproportionately affected by these events, often they are people forced to live on flood plains or in marginal areas which lack resilient infrastructure, access to water and sanitation, and other basic services.

 

Second, we are becoming too reliant on evacuation as a solution to saving lives and minimizing the injuries and ill-health which can accompany an extreme weather event or an earthquake when what is required is that we become better at managing the risks which drive these events before disaster strikes.

 

Third, it is time to act on the realization that we are living with unsustainably high levels of risk given what we know about the likely increase in intensity and frequency of extreme weather events linked to climate change, and population growth in hazard exposed areas.

 

These are just some of the reasons why I have been emphasizing two issues in particular in my speaking engagements at these recent regional meetings: the need for inclusion, and the importance of local strategies for disaster risk reduction wherever there is a human settlement.

 

If we do not include all sections of society in our planning for prevention and risk management, then we will see some groups suffer disproportionate loss of life not because they have been deliberately discriminated against but because their voices have not been heard and their needs have been overlooked.

 

We are getting better at disseminating early warnings, organizing evacuations and providing emergency aid and shelter as part of efforts to build urban resilience but we need to make a much greater effort to prevent displacement and find long-term solutions which reduce the risk of it happening.

 

Vital to this effort is ensuring an increase in the number of countries with national and local strategies for disaster risk reduction by 2020, a key target in the global plan for reducing disaster losses, the Sendai Framework.

 

Disaster risk is best managed at the local level where the results will quickly show. One outward sign that this is increasingly entering the mainstream is the growing number of municipalities who are opting to join UNISDR’s 4,000-strong Making Cities Resilient Campaign.

 

We need more countries to follow the examples of Mongolia and Bangladesh which have signed up all their cities and towns to the campaign.

 

Resilience for all does not come without effort. The future is unfolding before our very eyes; we cannot afford a half-hearted response.

Restoring Hope: Rethink & Re-imagine Our #Cities – Adopt #SDGDRR – #SDG18

World Urban Forum Bulletin: RESTORING HOPE: BUILDING BACK CITIES AND COMMUNITIES TOGETHER AFTER DISASTER:

David Evans, UN-Habitat, opened the session. Explaining that, ‘our actions should build on the resilience of people,’ he warned that excluding those affected by disasters during rebuilding will cause unintended harm. In his keynote address, Robert Glasser, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, noted that lack of knowledge and financial capacity leads to disaster vulnerability – gaps that can be filled through implementing the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction. Moderator Sri Husnaini Sofjan, Huairou Commission, invited panellists from Haiti, Iran, Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal and the Philippines to share their experiences of how they responded to disasters in their country. Panellists highlighted the importance of conducting training schemes for masons and engineers, and enabling affected populations to actively participate in rebuilding their communities following a disaster. Many underscored the importance of disaster preparedness.
 
Hans Guttman, Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre, moderated a second panel in the session. Panellists from the European Commission, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the UN Development Programme, and the World Bank called for increased engagement with those affected by disasters and recognition of their agency, emphasising the need for accountability, coordination and across all sectors and levels. Several added that time-sensitive preparedness plans are crucial, and the European Commission questioned how to ‘build back’ not just from natural disasters but from man-made disasters caused by civil war.
 
Audience members called for the inclusion of grassroots leaders, and particularly women, in disaster recovery, emphasising their roles as agents of change #SDGDRR#SDG18

The conclusion of the 9th World Urban Forum, #KualaLumpurDeclaration towards 2036 #SDGDRR – #SDG18

 

This is an emergency action opportunity to promote #SDG18 DISASTER RISK RESILIENCE for global disaster security with reference to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Response (#DRR). #SDGDRR #Resilience

 

Local government leaders must prioritise climate change action (#CCA) to mitigate and prepare for urban disaster risk reduction (#DRR). #ParisAgreement (#PA). Just half of the elected representatives or city officials arrive in office with a deep understanding of disaster risk-impact and climate change.

 

Non-avoidable risk-impact assessment in urban planning and design
Local implementation calls for the recognition and strengthening of local actors as agents for sustainable urban development and the promotion of decentralised government systems.

 

Every council’s planning committees casting plans way ahead of the next World Habitat Conference 2036.

 

Change proposed

 

By adopting SDG18 DISASTER RISK RESILIENCE will provide insightful examples for cities not only on the planning and implementing of the risk-sensitive plans but also on engaging multi-sectoral dialogue in resilience building processes; Risk-Informed Subnational Development Planning at all levels to put in place strong governance foundations so that risk-informed development can be sustained in near future planning and budgeting processes, tools, plans and policies, which in turn contributes directly to the implementation of Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (#Switch2Sendai), the New Urban Agenda (#NUA) and the Sustainable Development Goals (#SDGs).

 

The SDG18 would deliver risk-informed development through a comprehensive range of services, e.g. strengthen financial and institutional capacity within the Global Goals.

 

Outcome document-UN_Habitat_Urban Climatic Disaster Response – Adopt SDG18 – https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/ClimateChangeCentreReading-UN_Habitat_Urban-Climatic-Disaster-Response-Adopt-SDG18.pdf

 

Thank you for taking your time and interest in also local urban resilient development. “Bigger picture thinkers make better humans”

 

#forumbandarsedunia9

 

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