Secure a safer city in Reading’s New Local Plan

Reading Borough Council will not be able to accept representations made after Friday 26th January 2018.

Please see Climate Change Centre Reading’s representation below,

https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/ClimateChangeCentreReading-RBC-Planning-Policy-Team_A-representation-about-the-New-Local-Plan.pdf

#NewLocalPlan – #climatechange #ParisAgreement #SDGs

The purpose with this Representation/Objection is via policy innovation and risk/protection impact evaluation, to improve Reading’s local urban development practices and planning, to support the British realm and ambitions to become a great global leader in the fight against global warming. #UK

#DRR Disaster Risk Reduction – #DutytoProtect

Africa – Americas – Arab States – Asia & Pacific – Central Asia – Europe

 

When all the ice has melted, first I will be Warm and then I will be Cold.

Stay up-to-date with the analysis and outcomes of Disaster Risk Reduction and International Law Symposium 2017 by our Reading blog posts.

#ClimateChance #ClimateChance2017 #Agadir #COP22 #COP23 #ONG #Climat #Humanrights

1 #DRR Disaster Risk Reduction – “#Duty-to-Protect”

Disaster law initiatives to combat climate change – “Duty-to-Protect”

How to grapple with the increasing frequency and severity of a wide array of both ‘human-made’ and ‘natural’ disasters.

Experts say we have three years to save the planet

International law must comply by 2020 latest with national #disasterlaw

Under Sendai Framework priority 2 – Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk (Duty to protect);

Global and regional levels
28. To achieve this, it is important:
(a) To guide action at the regional level through agreed regional and sub-regional strategies and mechanisms for cooperation for disaster risk reduction, as appropriate, in the light of the present Framework, in order to foster more efficient planning, create common information systems and exchange good practices and programmes for cooperation and capacity development, in particular to address common and trans-boundary disaster risks;

Are disaster management services the main duty-bearers to roll out DRR?

Break down legal fragment between DRR, Climate adaptation, the Tree proposal, Sendai framework, the SDGs, also between nuclear regulations.

Land use and forestry proposal for 2021-2030 – Forest laws to reduce deforestation.

National framework regulations needed now in;

  • Land use and urban planning
  • Building codes – Retrofits of existing buildings, Exemplary new buildings and Efficient equipment
  • Environment and resource management
  • Safety standards

 

Connect DRR and climate change, after New Zeeland 2010 Building code demolish or rescue.

2011 International convention from prevention of pollution from ships.

Mexico mainstreamed DRR law in all sectors. France mayor sent to prison for ignoring DDR laws.

Civil protection law = Disaster management (law to much focus on response)

Sectoral laws like Climate change adoption laws and development approvals important in rural and sub-urban areas. Linkage between environment laws and climate change laws.

Why do we need a lawyer? Protection of rights links to disaster

Legal disaster

Customs law disaster

Why compulsion and force?

Why international? Paragraph 14 Cooperation legal and not

Consent Capacity Building (ILC) framework adopted 2 months after Sendai 2018 next

Legislation/Regulations Is it a Self form of disaster risk reduction DRR?

Can monitoring DRR indicators alone identify (urban/rural) hazards and exercise disaster relief law of public response?

Disaster Ill-star

1950-60 Defense did research on disaster

Values scope and scale of a loss

Volition choices in relation to hazards

Valocity policies response times’ project, risk, predict – time horizon

Vicinity geography also social cultural economic, legal overlays

Vulnerabilities = impact outcome (origin)

Viewpoints philosophy

Victims disaster label, response label (victim-hood)

Katrina –> Depress obsess –> Super dome

Victims vs. Cash / Charity patterns

Natural more emo than man-made disaster

2003 August heatwave 14 802 (living on climbing 7th floor) – Time frame Chernobyl 100 (1 000 cancer)

Does climate legislation and regulation protect Who is an (urban/rural) disaster victim, healthy/sick people?

 

Core DRR mitigation and prevention response to disasters and hazards – linked to relief union

1st November 1755 Lisbon earthquake 1/3 loss – Urbanisation important

Voltaire unforeseeable and random – Urbanisation important

1927 National Relief Union

Preventive measures against disasters

UN early warning systems – Iran earth quake 1963

Pollution Sustainable Development

1980 Prevention Natural Disaster Reduction

1992 Rio declaration

UNFCCC – Framework Climate Change

Kyoto protocol

1991 Resolution 46182

Yokohama Framework

Millennium change

Climate change, Human rights, Environment law

Sendai

PREVENTION at activities and measures to avoid existing and new disaster risks.

MITIGATION de-licensing or minimizing of impact of hazardous events.

PREPARDENESS capacity developed by governments responds and recover organisation, community or individuals to effectively anticipate respond to and recover from the impact of likely or imminent or current disasters.

Commentary

Early Warning Systems

SARC-agreement

The obligation of recording casualties is not an instrument of to reflect disaster victims

Urban Disaster Law

Duty is a conduct and not a result, to shall reduce risk of disaster and harm precaused thereby.

 

The U.?N. Human Rights Council adopted the resolution, which was submitted by the Brazilian and Ecuadorian governments, last month at its headquarters in Geneva. Diplomats say the document could now lay the groundwork for more cities-focused work by the council –>

GOOD NEWS Adopted resolution #L30 – 37th Meeting, 35th Session Human Rights Council http://webtv.un.org/watch/ahrc35l.30rev.1-vote-item3-37th-meeting-35th-regular-session-human-rights-council/548071109600

Can the Sendai framework be enforced? Is there a will to extend the new international treaties within the domestic jurisdiction?

Exploring accountability, implementation and enforcement in the Sendai framework

States have a disaster law impact on human rights not only in their own territories.  Also, often there is an extraterritorial disaster law impact – on people in the rest of the world.

This project aims to provide a critical evaluation of the law and policy of whether and to what extent disaster law vs. human rights law is and should be applicable to states extraterritoriality.

When forced climate migrants decide to make perilous border crossings: the causal role of disaster

Themes:
Climate Change, Community-based DRR, Education & School Safety, Environment & Ecosystems, Gender, Health & Health Facilities, Disaster Risk Management, Critical Infrastructure, Vulnerable Populations, Children and Youth

#ClimateChance #CCAgadir17 #Cities #EUSEW17 #c40cities #NUA #NAU #CCCRdg #Habitat3 #Humanrights

 

#SendaiFramework #Switch2Sendai #Policy #Governance

#Cities #Safety #Arctic #Maritime

#UCEEP

#HumanRights

#DRRplanning

#REinsurance

#Implementation

#EWS #EarlyWarningSystems

#Hazards

#Federation Disaster Law Programme

#RedCross #Oilspills #ocean #ships #environment

#Disasterlaw #UrbanDisasterLaw

#law #disaster #risk #reduction

 

Habitat III Conference in #Quito in October 2016 should show territorial coherence

totheworld2

Congratulations to the Netherlands parliament’s brave decision to close down their coal industry. 

Thank you to #ClimateChance and partner for organising this important stakeholder event in Nantes.

Thank you, to the Habitat III Panel discussing the #NewUrbanAgenda (NUA) in this climate forum – “On the road to Habitat III, what is the place for proposals from non-state actors?” (28/09/16, 9-11 am)

It was mentioned that 15 of the paragraphs of the New Urban Agenda addresses cities and climate change. Economic growth and development is mentioned as many times! While half the world is trying to stop the petroleum companies from drilling activities.. These two polarised position doesn’t match!

The NUA’s responsibility is to make cities divest from fossil energy and reinvest in urban sustainable opportunities.

We stress the importance of the use of funds mobilized by climate action, both mitigation and adaptation, for the development of sustainable cities and rural territories, considering that the New Urban Agenda that will be adopted by the UN member States during Habitat III Conference in Quito in October 2016 should show territorial coherence respecting the various global challenges we face.

In the agreed Habitat III document we need a paragraph about urban degrowth and protecting our green belts, shrinking cities,, There should even be a shut-down paragraph of cities and how to rewild shut-down cities.
https://www2.habitat3.org/bitcache/97ced11dcecef85d41f74043195e5472836f6291?vid=588897&disposition=inline&op=view

What is the really the views of the on the new data driven UN-cities concept?

Is the Habitat III agenda about smart purpose driven cities or is Habitat III trying to create a city in city?  When it comes to stakeholder’s engagement and multi-actor governance, this is urgent;

·        Keep it simple

·        Implementation, Implementation, Implementation

·        Build back better

What is the military’s stakeholder role in the new urban agenda? Military reserves for urban capability building in a peaceful world.

How will the new urban agenda leaver with liberté, égalité, fraternité? Maybe it’s time to change city development to “opportunité de villes”!

Wouldn’t we prefer to see purpose-driven agenda, with one purpose to sustain, all urban human activities..

“Proud to be on the list of the “Nantes Declaration of climate actors” signatories that will be presented in Quito during Habitat III”

 

http://www.climatechance2016.com/en

http://www.climatechance2016.com/uploads/media/5800c65beb61c.pdf

#Goal13 City Levels Green, Amber or even Red

#Goal13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

The highly developed industrialized nations’ responsibility to combat climate change is obvious and cannot be overestimated. Similar to the issue of sustainable consumption and production patterns, the rich countries need to become leading examples if the goal of combating climate change and its consequences is not to remain mere lip service. Effectively reducing CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions is imperative in this regard. The data displayed in figures 13.1 and 13.2 show how far many OECD countries are still lagging behind compared to the respective benchmark countries of the sample.

13_1

Click on the picture to enlarge

Figure 13.1 provides information on production-based CO2 emissions per capita. “Production-based” means that emissions refer to gross direct CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion, emitted within the national territory excluding bunkers, sinks, and indirect effects. In the fi ve leading countries, Mexico, Turkey, Sweden, Portugal, and Hungary, as well as in sixth-ranked Chile, production based CO2 emissions are below 5 tons per capita. These countries’ performances stand in stark contrast to the respective emission levels of countries placed at the bottom of the list, such as Canada, the United States, Australia, and Luxembourg. Here, CO2 emissions range from 15.3 (Canada) to 19.47 tons per capita (Luxembourg).

13_2

Click on the picture to enlarge

The second snapshot indicator links emission levels to the size of a country’s economy, and refers to total greenhouse gas emissions per GDP. Greenhouse gas emissions include land use, land-use change, and forestry, and are measured in CO2 equivalents as a percentage of GDP (tons per million constant 2005 int. USD PPP). The findings are remarkable: While Sweden is by far the top-performing country with an amount of 66.75 tons, Estonia comes in last place with 680 tons – more than ten times as much as in the case of the leading country. Moreover, Sweden is the only country ranked among the top five on both indicators chosen here.

With regard to greenhouse gas emissions per GDP, Norway, Switzerland, Finland, and France follow in places two to five. In fifth-ranked France, however, emissions are already nearly four times as high as in Sweden. At the negative end of the spectrum, Canada and Australia again find themselves in the bottom group. Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions per GDP amount to 641 tons, which means that the country ranks second to last on both indicators of goal 13.

Source: SDG Index and Dashboards – Global Report

Habitat III Consultations Prioritize Actions for New Urban Agenda

Habitat III Consultations Prioritize Actions for New Urban Agenda

hiii3 May 2016: UN Member States, international organizations and stakeholders held a week-long session of Open-Ended Informal Consultative Meetings in preparation for the UN Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III). The Meeting aimed to advance discusssions on the New Urban Agenda to be adopted at Habitat III, and to prioritize actions and identify transformative commitments to move towards sustainable cities.

The Meetings convened at UN Headquarters in New York, US, from 25-29 April 2016.

Habitat III Secretary-General Joan Clos said the New Urban Agenda should complement recent “landmark” UN processes, including:

  • the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) 2015-2030
  • the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development (FfD)
  • the Paris Agreement on climate change
  • the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 11 (Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable).

The meeting was organized around: regional perspectives; transformative commitments for sustainable urban development; effective implementation; and how to enhance means of implementation (MOI). Panel discussions examined recommendations and outputs of the ten Habitat III Policy Units, which focus on: the right to the city and cities for all; socio-cultural urban framework; national urban policies; urban governance, capacity and institutional development; municipal finance and local fiscal systems; urban spatial strategies – land market and segregation; urban economic development strategies; urban ecology and resilience; urban services and technology; and housing policies.

Panels took place on the outcomes of the seven Habitat III thematic meetings that have taken place as part of the preparatory process, which focused on: civic engagement; metropolitan areas; intermediate cities; sustainable energy and cities; financing urban development; public spaces; and informal settlements. Another session reviewed the outcomes of the Habitat III regional meeting.

In the closing session, Clos stressed the importance of urbanization for sustainable development, noting that the understanding of development has changed, as well as that of the role of urbanization in promoting prosperity. Meeting Co-Chair Maryse Gautier, France, welcomed the engagement of all stakeholders and summarized key messages from the week, including that: the resource management system is necessary; urban development must take into account the protection and maintenance of cultural heritage to ensure inclusive cities; informal sectors must be taken into account during spatial planning; and finance must be further mobilized.

Earlier in the month, the final regional meeting for Habitat III took place in Toluca, Mexico, from 18-20 April 2016, with a focus on priority issues for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). The meeting resulted in the Toluca Declaration, which will serve as input to the New Urban Agenda. The Toluca Declaration proposes that the following issues be addressed in the New Urban Agenda: urban and territorial planning; urban governance; adequate housing; water and sanitation; sustainable mobility; land management; and environment, climate change and resilience.

The New Urban Governance

The Declaration calls for a new generation of national urban policies built on a new urbanization paradigm that promotes accessibility, adequate housing, equity, security, mobility and cultural identity. It further identifies elements for implementation of the New Urban Agenda at the national and local levels, including: developing innovative models of multi-level governance; promoting institutional solidity, professionalism, transparency and accountability in urban management; establishing spaces for citizens to participate in urban development; promoting sub-national financing mechanisms; and using information technology and communications in public decision making.

 

Source: iisd

 

Prague to host the United Nations’ European Habitat Conference #habitat3

Prague

Climate Change Centre Reading, is honored to participate at the UN regional meeting European Habitat Conference as a climate advocate for natural weather shelter / protection of #urbanthinkers. The conference will take place in the Prague Congress Centre, Prague, Czech Republic between March 16 to 18, 2016

Habitat III Europe Regional Meeting “European Habitat” will involve a wide range of participants, that will debate regional priorities for the New Urban Agenda, and policy recommendations in the form of a final regional participants’ declaration. The “European Habitat”, is an international regional conference organised within the framework of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). It is one of five regional commissions of the United Nations, bringing together 56 member countries from Europe, the Balkans, North America and a part of Asia. The event is an official part of preparations for the third global UN Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development “Habitat III”. Based on a decision of the UN General Assembly adopted in December 2014, this conference should be held in Ecuador in October 2016. The event is being prepared by the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat). UNO regional conferences are organised by individual regional economic commissions – and it is UNECE that covers the 56 above mentioned member countries (UNECE Member States).

In this regard, “European Habitat” will gather recommendations reflecting the consensus reached at the regional level on sustainable housing and other topics from the spectrum of a proposed New #UrbanAgenda.

Join us at this exciting opportunity to discuss the challenges of Sustainable “Housing in Liveable Cities”.

In the process towards a New Urban Agenda, Habitat III Europe Regional Meeting “European Habitat” will discuss how to ensure access to decent, adequate, affordable and healthy housing for all, with due attention to reducing the impact of the housing sector on the environment. Final declaration from “European Habitat” will be considered official inputs to the Habitat III process. Join us at this exciting opportunity to discuss the challenges of Sustainable Housing in Liveable Cities.

The official outcome of the European Habitat conference will be the Prague Declaration whose draft was discussed in December 2015 at the plenary session of the UNECE Committee on Housing and Land Management, the UNECE executive body for housing and urban development. In October 2014, the Committee discussed and adopted the Geneva UN Charter on Sustainable Housing, which was then approved by UNECE’s Plenary in April 2015 as the official contribution of the relevant region to the Habitat III conference. The Geneva UN Charter on Sustainable Housing is an essential strategic document which the Prague Declaration develops further. The European Habitat is one of the first UN implementing conferences reflecting the goals of UN post-2015 Development Agenda.

Final “Prague Declaration” from “European Habitat” will be considered official inputs to the Habitat III process.

The #UN European Habitat Conference, is part of the roadmap to #Habitat3 in QUITO – OCTOBER 2016.

#TheWorldWeWant #TheCityWeNeed #Futureofplaces #Placemaking #SDG13 #SDGs #FutureofPlaces #COP21 #COP22 #Habitat3 #NewUrbanAgenda #PublicSpace #WUC #TheFutureWeWant #TheCityWeNeed #UrbanSDG #UrbanAction #UrbanThinkers #Youngplacemakers #ClimateAction #OpenSpace

Background

Based on a decision of the UN General Assembly, the city of Quito, Ecuador, will host the third global UN Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (the “Habitat III conference”) from 17 to 20 October, 2016. These summits take place every twenty years; the first one was organised in June 1976 in Vancouver, Canada, the second summit “Habitat II” took place in June 1996 in Istanbul, Turkey.

The official outcome of the Habitat III summit will be the adoption of the discussed document (New Urban Agenda), responding to development in urban areas, with respect to the ever increasing share of the world’s population living in towns and cities (by 2050 the share will be 70%).

Preparations for the Habitat III summit are carried out according to the procedure approved by UN General Assembly; the process is managed by the Steering Committee of Habitat III.

(UN–Habitat) is the United Nations agency for human settlements and sustainable urban development. It was established in 1978 as an outcome of the First UN Conference on Human Settlements and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat I) held in Vancouver, Canada in 1976. UN-Habitat maintains its headquarters at the United Nations Office at Nairobi, Kenya. It is mandated by the United Nations General Assembly to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. It is a member of the United Nations Development Group. The mandate of UN-Habitat derives from the Habitat Agenda, adopted by the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1996. The twin goals of the Habitat Agenda are adequate shelter for all and the development of sustainable human settlements in an urbanizing world.

Invitation Boroughs of Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire

Nordic_declarationInvitation to BOBShire’s Capitals‘ Declaration on #ClimateChange 2017

Venue and programme for the workshop need to be set,
Pre-register interest here, BOBShire @ CCCRdg .org .uk

Join the wave of change. Sign the Appel de Paris here, http://www.parispledgeforaction.org/read

Project ideas emerged from breakout groups for each of the following #RE100 challenges:

KIC

  • How to include quality of life (the social dimension) in climate-oriented city solutions
  • How to create incentives for people to choose to be ”climate smart” in their everyday choices
  • How to create city climate targets, measure progress and engage more actors
  • How to remove barriers that enable cities to implement more (and better) testbeds

Check back for more information

/Climate Change Centre Reading

 

Source: reykjavik.is

For immediate Release GaiaDoc.org

For immediate Release

GaiaDoc.org has launched a fit for purpose replacement text for #COP21 #Paris2015 Urgent International Draft

EMERGENCY CLIMATE CHANGE PREVENTION CHARTER (CCPC) .pdf

For-immediate-Release-GaiaDoc

Source: GaiaDoc.org

 

 

(INSUDENE)/ GAIADOC) – #ICSD2015 EMERGENCY #SDG hoax

Climate Change Centre Reading does support the “#GlobalGoals” but to acknowledge and support the ratification of the Zero Draft document TRANSFORMING OUR WORLD: THE 2030 AGENDA FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT is #SDGhoax and equal to signing a planetary death sentence.

I refuse to debate what is common sense.  I am a sensible person who does not normally sign petitions.

– THIS ONE IS DIFFERENT.. (not completely right, not completely wrong)
#scrutinytime

INSUDENE/ GAIADOC

______________________________________________________________

Emergency proposal for United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 

Replacement to Draft Proposal for the United Nations Summit for the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda (25 to 27 September 2015 New York)

The International United Nations Legal Agreement To Restore the Global Commons to its Required Natural State

This text gives a new sustainable bright option for humankind. You are here faced with two roads, one bright, worthy and wise, another deeply dark, selfish and floored, we ask you to take the bold step to read on and ensure that it is agreed at this meeting.

The The time for procrastination has long since passed; the world is in a state of emergency and further inaction is gross negligence. The actual and anticipated impacts of our current use of resources as well as its unintended consequences, and the short-term and long-term effects that are known and yet to be known have all contributed to the state of emergency. Any denial of the state of emergency is eclipsed by the moral imperative and legal obligation to abide by the precautionary principle.

Source GaiaDoc

 

Explore the #SDGs #100Indicators and a Monitoring Framework

Indicators by Goal

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

  1. Availability and implementation of a transparent and detailed deep decarbonization strategy, consistent with the 2°C – or below – global carbon budget, and with GHG emission targets for 2020, 2030 and 2050.
  1. CO2 intensity of new power generation capacity installed (gCO2 per kWh), and of new cars (gCO2/pkm) and trucks (gCO2/tkm)
  1. Net GHG emissions in the Agriculture, Forest and other Land Use (AFOLU) sector (tCO2e)
  1. Official climate financing from developed countries that is incremental to ODA (in US$)

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

  1. Percentage of urban population living in slums or informal settlements (MDG Indicator)
  1. Percentage of people within 0.5km of public transit running at least every 20 minutes.
  1. [Ratio of land consumption rate to population growth rate, at comparable scale] – to be developed
  1. Mean urban air pollution of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5)
  1. Area of public and green space as a proportion of total city space
  1. Percentage of urban solid waste regularly collected and well managed

Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

  1. [Indicator on inequality at top end of income distribution: GNI share of richest 10% or Palma ratio]
  1. Percentage of households with incomes below 50% of median income (“relative poverty”)

Source: indicators.report